Uneven Ground: Appalachian Readings

Before I jump into this month’s book, I want to take a moment to celebrate a dear family member we lost on Memorial Day. Great Uncle George was an inspiration to so many, and it is fitting that he left us on a holiday meant to remember those who died while serving this country. He […]

What You Are Getting Wrong about Appalachia: Appalachian Readings

For April, I chose to read What You Are Getting Wrong about Appalachia, Elizabeth Catte’s response to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte states that her book has two objectives: “to provide critical commentary about who benefits from the omission of . . . voices” and “to openly celebrate the lives, actions, and legacies of those ignored in popular commentary […]

California Dreamin’

Way back in October, I joined my brother, Sam, who is based out of Knoxville, on a three-day business trip to California. While he worked, I played. After a two-hour flight delay in Indianapolis because the plane “smelled weird,” I finally landed in LA, greeted by my brother, his friend Christian, and an awesome In-N-Out […]

Hillbilly Elegy: Appalachian Readings

While contemplating which books to read as part of my resolution, a light bulb came on. I realized that my true reason for this project was to re-immerse myself in Appalachian literature in order to respond intelligently to Hillbilly Elegy. Once I connected those dots, I decided to get it over with. Hillbilly Elegy is […]

Dear Appalachia: Appalachian Readings

Continuing my 2018 resolution to read more books about Appalachia, I chose Dear Appalachia: Readers, Identity, and Popular Fiction since 1878 by Emily Satterwhite for February. In Dear Appalachia, Satterwhite looks at reader responses to popular Appalachian regional fiction from the late 1800s to present day. I’ll admit, I haven’t read all the books Satterwhite discusses, but I’ve […]

On Homesickness: Appalachian Readings

A resolution of mine for 2018 is to read more books about Appalachia. I was an Appalachian studies minor back in the day at Berea College, and my writing and, honestly, my identity are wrapped up in the region. Because I do best with goals, I decided to read one book on Appalachia each month. […]

Nevertheless, She Persisted

2017 has been a hard one for new ideas. My brain is bogged down in the political and moral fights the year has wrought. But creating in such a space also allows for the combination of art and politics. A while back, I created a chalkboard for Gather featuring the words of Mitch McConnell regarding […]